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Publication numberUS20150202074 A1
Publication typeApplication
Application numberUS 14/674,986
Publication dateJul 23, 2015
Filing dateMar 31, 2015
Priority dateMay 12, 2008
Also published asEP2291152A1, EP2291152A4, US8327854, US8707960, US8991398, US20110144421, US20120024298, US20130098374, WO2009140197A1
Publication number14674986, 674986, US 2015/0202074 A1, US 2015/202074 A1, US 20150202074 A1, US 20150202074A1, US 2015202074 A1, US 2015202074A1, US-A1-20150202074, US-A1-2015202074, US2015/0202074A1, US2015/202074A1, US20150202074 A1, US20150202074A1, US2015202074 A1, US2015202074A1
InventorsEdward M. Gillis, Octavian Iancea
Original AssigneeEdward M. Gillis, Octavian Iancea
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Partially erodable systems for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea
US 20150202074 A1
Abstract
A method of maintaining airway patency in an airway of a patient which includes the steps of implanting a device into tissue adjacent an airway, the device having a bioerodable material wound around a resiliently deformable body to temporarily maintain the deformable body in a stretched, deformed state, and permitting the bioerodable material of the device to bioerode to apply a force to maintain airway patency. The invention also provides devices for practicing the method.
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Claims(20)
What is claimed is:
1. A method of maintaining airway patency in an airway of a patient, the method comprising:
implanting a device into tissue adjacent an airway, the device having a bioerodable element maintaining the body in a deformed stretched shape against a return force and at least one soft tissue anchor configured to affix to soft tissue adjacent the airway, the tissue anchor comprising a through hole; and
permitting the bioerodable element of the device to bioerode to release the body from its stretched, deformed state, thereby allowing the body to contract to apply a force from the at least one tissue anchor to the affixed soft tissue adjacent to the airway to maintain airway patency.
2. The method of claim 1 further comprising expanding a portion of the device without affixing the device to the tissue.
3. The method of claim 2 wherein the expanding step comprises permitting the portion of the device to self-expand.
4. The method of claim 1 further comprising permitting newly formed tissue to infiltrate the through hole of the at least one anchor.
5. The method of claim 4 wherein the newly formed tissue at least partially infiltrates the device prior to applying a force to the tissue adjacent the airway.
6. The method of claim 1 wherein the implanting step comprises inserting the device into tongue tissue.
7. The method of claim 1 wherein the implanting step comprises inserting the device into soft palate tissue.
8. The method of claim 1 further comprising releasing a bioactive agent from the bioerodable portion as it bioerodes.
9. A device for maintaining patency of an airway of a patient comprising:
a body having an at-rest shape and a stretched, deformed shape, the body being adapted to be implanted into soft tissue adjacent an airway of the patient;
a bioerodable element configured to maintain the body in the stretched, deformed shape against a return force upon implantation;
at least one soft tissue anchor comprising a through hole, adapted to be implanted into the soft tissue adjacent the airway without affixing the device to the tissue at a time when the device is implanted, and adapted to be infiltrated by tissue to affix the anchor to the soft tissue; and
the body being configured to return toward the at-rest shape upon erosion of the bioerodable element, such that the body applies a force from the at least one tissue anchor to the soft tissue adjacent the airway.
10. The device of claim 9 wherein the body is sized and shaped to be inserted into tongue tissue.
11. The device of claim 9 wherein the body is sized and shaped to be inserted into soft palate tissue.
12. The device of claim 9 wherein the body is sized and shaped to be inserted into pharyngeal tissue.
13. The device of claim 9 wherein the bioerodable element comprises a coil.
14. The device of claim 9 wherein the bioerodable element comprises a C-shaped element.
15. The device of claim 9 wherein the at least one tissue anchor is adapted to expand.
16. The device of claim 9 wherein the at least one tissue anchor is adapted to self-expand.
17. The device of claim 9 wherein the at least one tissue anchor comprises non woven material.
18. The device of claim 9 wherein the at least one tissue anchor comprises a plurality of through holes.
19. The device of claim 9 wherein the at least one tissue anchor comprises braided material.
20. The device of claim 9 further comprising an elutable bioactive agent.
Description
    CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS
  • [0001]
    This application is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/711,537, filed Dec. 11, 2012, now U.S. Pat. No. 8,991,398, which is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 13/269,520, filed Oct. 7, 2011, now U.S. Pat. No. 8,327,854, which is a continuation of U.S. application Ser. No. 12/937,564, filed Jan0 3, 2011, now U.S. Pat. No. 8,707,960, which is a 371 of International Application No. PCT/US2009/043450, filed May 11, 2009, which claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. 119(e) of U.S. Provisional Application No. 61/052,586, filed May 12, 2008, the disclosures of which are incorporated herein by reference.
  • INCORPORATION BY REFERENCE
  • [0002]
    All publications and patent applications mentioned in this specification are herein incorporated by reference to the same extent as if each individual publication or patent application was specifically and individually indicated to be incorporated by reference.
  • BACKGROUND
  • [0003]
    The invention relates to the field of methods and devices for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea, and more particularly to opening the airway of subjects with symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea.
  • [0004]
    Sleep apnea is defined as the cessation of breathing for ten seconds or longer during sleep. During normal sleep, the throat muscles relax and the airway narrows. During the sleep of a subject with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), the upper airway narrows significantly more than normal, and during an apneic event, undergoes a complete collapse that stops airflow. In response to a lack of airflow, the subject is awakened at least to a degree sufficient to reinitiate breathing. Apneic events and the associated arousals can occur up to hundreds of times per night, and become highly disruptive of sleep. Obstructive sleep apnea is commonly but not exclusively associated with a heavy body type, a consequence of which is a narrowed oropharyngeal airway.
  • [0005]
    Cyclic oxygen desaturation and fragmented sleeping patterns lead to daytime sleepiness, the hallmark symptom of the disorder. Further consequences of sleep apnea may include chronic headaches and depression, as well as diminished facilities such as vigilance, concentration, memory, executive function, and physical dexterity. Ultimately, sleep apnea is highly correlated with increased mortality and life threatening comorbidities. Cardiology complications include hypertension, congestive heart failure, coronary artery disease, cardiac arrhythmias, and atrial fibrillation. OSA is a highly prevalent disease conditions in the United States. An estimated 18 million Americans suffer from OSA to degrees that range from mild to severe, many of whom are undiagnosed, at least in part because the afflicted subjects are often unaware of their own condition.
  • [0006]
    Treatment of OSA usually begins with suggested lifestyle changes, including weight loss and attention to sleeping habits (such as sleep position and pillow position), or the use of oral appliances that can be worn at night and help position the tongue away from the back of the airway. More aggressive physical interventions include the use of breathing assist systems (such as continuous positive airway pressure machines) that provide a positive pressure to the airway through a mask worn by the subject. In some cases, pharmaceutical interventions can be helpful, but they generally are directed toward countering daytime sleepiness and do not address the root cause. Some surgical interventions are available, such as nasal surgeries, tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy, reductions in the soft palate or the uvula or the tongue base, or advancing the tongue base by an attachment to the mandible and pulling the base forward. These surgical approaches can be quite invasive and thus have a last-resort aspect to them and simply do not reliably alleviate or cure the condition. There is a need for less invasive procedures that show promise for greater therapeutic reliability.
  • [0007]
    Related devices and methods are described in U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/969,201, filed 3 Jan. 2008, the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference.
  • SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE
  • [0008]
    The present invention provides methods and devices for treating obstructive sleep apnea. Embodiments of the invention include methods for opening a collapsed or obstructed airway with devices that can be implanted into various tissues that form the airway.
  • [0009]
    Embodiments of the devices include resiliently deformable materials and bioerodable materials. The deformable portion of the devices is first formed into a preferred shape which is then subsequently deformed and stabilized in that deformed shape by incorporation or application of bioerodable materials to create a device in its implantable form. Once implanted into a tissue site, and thus exposed to an aqueous environment and to cellular and enzymatic action, the bioerodable portions of the device erode, thereby allowing the deformable portion of the device to return toward an at-rest form. Embodiments of the method, in their simplest form, thus include implanting a device, the bioerodable portion of the device bioeroding, the device changing shape as a consequence of the bioeroding, and the tissue remodeling in accordance with the force being exerted by the shape changing of the device.
  • [0010]
    One aspect of the invention provides a method of maintaining airway patency in an airway of a patient. The method includes the steps of implanting a device into airway-forming tissue without affixing the device to the tissue and permitting a bioerodable portion of the device to bioerode to apply a force to the airway-forming tissue to maintain airway patency. In some embodiments, the method also includes the step of expanding a portion of the device without affixing the device to the tissue, such as by, for example, permitting the portion of the device to self-expand. In various embodiments, the implanting step may include the step of inserting the device into the patient submandibularly, sublingually, and/or intra-orally.
  • [0011]
    In some embodiments, the permitting step includes the step of changing a shape of the device when the bioerodable portion bioerodes, such as by changing a length, curvature and/or width of the device. The method may also include the step of permitting newly formed tissue to infiltrate the device, possibly with the newly formed tissue at least partially infiltrating the device prior to applying a force to the airway-forming tissue.
  • [0012]
    In various embodiments, the implanting step includes the step of inserting the device into tongue tissue, soft palate tissue, pharyngeal wall tissue and/or epiglottis tissue. The method may also include the step of releasing a bioactive agent from the bioerodable portion as it bioerodes.
  • [0013]
    Another aspect of the invention provides a device for maintaining patency of an airway of a patient. In some embodiments, the device has a body having an at-rest shape and a deformed shape, the body being adapted to be implanted into airway-forming tissue of the patient, and proximal and distal anchors adapted to be implanted into the airway-forming tissue, without affixing the device to the tissue, and to be infiltrated by tissue to affix the anchors to the airway-forming tissue, with at least one bioerodable element maintaining the body in the deformed shape against a return force and the body being configured to return toward the at-rest shape upon erosion of the bioerodable element. In various embodiments, the body is sized and shaped to be inserted into tongue tissue, into soft palate tissue, and/or into pharyngeal tissue.
  • [0014]
    In various embodiments, the bioerodable element includes a coil and/or a C-shaped element. In some embodiments, at least one of the proximal and distal anchors is adapted to expand, possibly through self-expansion. One or more of the anchors may contain woven and/or non-woven material and may include through-holes to permit tissue in-growth. One or more of the anchors may also contain braided material.
  • [0015]
    In some embodiments, the device's deformed shape is longer, straighter and/or wider than its at-rest shape. The device may also have an elutable bioactive agent in some embodiments.
  • BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
  • [0016]
    The novel features of the invention are set forth with particularity in the claims that follow. A better understanding of the features and advantages of the present invention will be obtained by reference to the following detailed description that sets forth illustrative embodiments, in which the principles of the invention are utilized, and the accompanying drawings of which:
  • [0017]
    FIG. 1 shows an overview of the healthy human airway anatomy, with particular attention to the nasopharyngeal, oropharangeal, and hypopharyngeal regions.
  • [0018]
    FIG. 2 provides a view of a compromised airway, with an occlusion in the oropharyngeal region due to posterior slippage of the base of the tongue and a thickened posterior pharyngeal wall.
  • [0019]
    FIG. 3 provides a view of a compromised airway, with an occlusion in the nasopharyngeal region due to posterior slippage of the soft palate.
  • [0020]
    FIG. 4 provides a view of a compromised airway, with an occlusion in the oropharyngeal region due to posterior slippage of the base of the tongue and the soft palate, a thickened posterior pharyngeal wall, and posterior flopping of the epiglottis.
  • [0021]
    FIGS. 5A-C show an airway-maintaining device according to one embodiment of the invention.
  • [0022]
    FIGS. 6A-B show an airway-maintaining device according to another embodiment of the invention. FIG. 6B is an enlarged cross-section along the lines shown in FIG. 6A.
  • [0023]
    FIGS. 6C-D show an airway-maintaining device according to yet another embodiment of the invention. FIG. 6D is an enlarged cross-section along the lines shown in FIG. 6C.
  • [0024]
    FIGS. 6E-F show an airway-maintaining device according to still another embodiment of the invention. FIG. 6F is an enlarged cross-section along the lines shown in FIG. 6E.
  • [0025]
    FIGS. 6G-H show an airway-maintaining device according to another embodiment of the invention. FIG. 6H is an enlarged cross-section along the lines shown in FIG. 6G.
  • [0026]
    FIGS. 6I-J show an airway-maintaining device according to yet another embodiment of the invention. FIG. 6J is a cross-section along the lines shown in FIG. 6I.
  • [0027]
    FIGS. 7A-C show implantation and use of an airway-maintaining device delivered submandibularly.
  • [0028]
    FIGS. 8A-C show implantation and use of an airway-maintaining device delivered intraorally and sublingually.
  • [0029]
    FIGS. 9A-C show implantation and use of an airway-maintaining device delivered intraorally to the soft palate.
  • [0030]
    FIGS. 10A-C show details of the device shown in FIG. 9.
  • [0031]
    FIGS. 11A-B show details of the device shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 in place in the soft palate.
  • [0032]
    FIGS. 12A-B show an airway maintaining device according to yet another embodiment of the invention in place in the patient.
  • [0033]
    FIG. 13 is a graph comparing tensile force applied by embodiments of the invention and theoretical force applied by other obstructive sleep apnea therapy devices.
  • [0034]
    FIGS. 14A-C show an airway-maintaining device according to still another embodiment of the invention.
  • [0035]
    FIGS. 15A-B show the device of FIG. 14 in place in patient.
  • [0036]
    FIGS. 16A-B show the devices of FIGS. 8 and 9 in place in a patient.
  • [0037]
    FIGS. 17A-E show multiple devices of FIGS. 8 and 9 in place in a patient.
  • [0038]
    FIGS. 18A-C show another embodiment of the airway maintaining device of this invention.
  • DETAILED DESCRIPTION
  • [0039]
    FIG. 1 is a sagittal view of the structures that form the pharyngeal airway 4. Some of these structures can become compromised under various conditions to the extent that they obstruct or occlude passage of air through the airway 4 and thus contribute to obstructive sleep apnea. The pharynx is divided, from superior to inferior, into the nasopharynx 1, the oropharynx 2 and the hypopharynx 3. Variations of FIG. 1 are provided in FIGS. 2, 3, and 4, which depict airway obstruction sites 5 at various levels in the pharyngeal airway. FIG. 2, for example, shows an occlusion 5 at the level of the oropharynx 2, where the base of the tongue 16 and a thickened posterior pharyngeal wall 22 have collapsed against each other. FIG. 3 shows an occlusion 5 at the level of the nasopharynx 1, where an elongated and/or floppy soft palate 6 has collapsed against a thickened posterior pharyngeal wall 22. FIG. 4 shows an occlusion 5 at the level of the oropharynx and nasopharynx 1 and 2, where both an elongated soft palate 6, base of tongue 16 and a floppy epiglottis 12 have collapsed against the pharyngeal wall 22.
  • [0040]
    With reference to FIGS. 1-4, the nasopharynx 1 is the portion of the pharynx at the level or above the soft palate 6. In the nasopharynx, a deviated nasal septum or enlarged nasal turbinates 10 may occasionally contribute to upper airway resistance or blockage. Rarely, a nasal mass, such as a polyp, cyst or tumor may be a source of obstruction. The oropharynx 2 includes structures from the soft palate 6 to the upper border of the epiglottis 12 and includes the inferior surface of the hard palate 14, tongue 16, tonsils 18, palatoglossal arch 20, the posterior pharyngeal wall 22 and the mandible 24. The mandible typically has a bone thickness of about 5 mm to about 10 mm anteriorly with similar thicknesses laterally. An obstruction in the oropharynx 2 may result when the tongue 16 is displaced posteriorly during sleep as a consequence of reduced muscle activity during deep or non-REM sleep. The displaced tongue 16 may push the soft palate 6 posteriorly and may seal off the nasopharynx 1 from the oropharynx 2. The tongue 16 may also contact the posterior pharyngeal wall 22, which causes further airway obstruction.
  • [0041]
    The hypopharynx 3 includes the region from the upper border of the epiglottis 12 to the inferior border of the cricoid cartilage 14. The hypopharynx 3 further includes the hyoid bone 28, a U-shaped, free-floating bone that does not articulate with any other bone. The hyoid bone 28 is attached to surrounding structures by various muscles and connective tissues. The hyoid bone 28 lies inferior to the tongue 16 and superior to the thyroid cartilage 30. A thyrohyoid membrane 17 and a thyrohyoid muscle 18 attaches to the inferior border of the hyoid 28 and the superior border of the thyroid cartilage 30. The epiglottis 12 is infero-posterior to the hyoid bone 28 and attaches to the hyoid bone by a median hyoepiglottic ligament. The hyoid bone attaches anteriorly to the infero-posterior aspect of the mandible 24 by the geniohyoid muscle.
  • [0042]
    The invention provides a method of maintaining airway patency in an airway of a patient by implanting one or more devices into airway-forming tissue and permitting a bioerodable portion of the device to bioerode, thereby applying a force to the airway-forming tissue to maintain airway patency due to, e.g., a curvature, length or width change in the device. In some embodiments, the device or devices are implanted without initially affixing the device to the tissue. Over time, tissue ingrowth into the devices may provide some fixation of the devices to the airway-forming tissue prior to the bioerosion and the device shape change. Various embodiments of shape-changing implants may be used to practice the invention, and the devices may be implanted into various parts of the patient's airway-forming tissue, as needed.
  • [0043]
    FIGS. 5A-C show one embodiment of a device 500 that may be implanted in airway-forming tissue to maintain patency of the patient's airway. Device 500 has a body 502 with a plurality of narrow sections 504 separated by wide sections 506. As shown, the narrow and wide sections are cylindrical, although other shapes may be used. The body 502 may be made of a resiliently deformable material, such as silicone rubber, polyurethanes or other resiliently deformable polymer or a coil of stainless steel, spring steel, or superelastic nickel-titanium alloy or other resiliently deformable metal, or a composite of the resiliently deformable polymer and metal.
  • [0044]
    FIG. 5B shows body 502 in its at-rest shape. In FIG. 5A, body 502 has been stretched to a deformed shape. Spacers 508 formed from a bioerodable or bioabsorbable material (such as, e.g., polycaprolactone, polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid, polylactide coglycolide, polyglactin, poly-L-lactide, polyhydroxalkanoates, starch, cellulose, chitosan, or structural protein) have been inserted between wide sections 506 to maintain the device in its deformed shape. In this embodiment, the spacers 508 are injection molded and have a C shape, although other manufacturing techniques and other shapes may be used as desired.
  • [0045]
    Anchors 510 are formed at both ends of body 502. In this embodiment, anchors 510 are formed from a non-woven fabric (such as polypropylene, polyethylene, or polyester) to promote tissue ingrowth. Other anchors may be used, as desired.
  • [0046]
    Device 500 may be implanted in a patient's airway-forming tissue in the deformed shape shown in FIG. 5A. In some embodiments, the device 500 is not affixed to the airway-forming tissue when implanted. Over time, tissue may grow into the fabric of anchors 510 to at least partially affix the device to the airway-forming tissue. Also over time, the bioerodable spacers 508 will bioerode, thereby permitting device 500 to move back toward the at-rest form shown in FIG. 5A. As it attempts to return to its at-rest shape, device 500 exerts a force on the airway-forming tissue into which it is implanted to maintain the patient's airway in a patent condition.
  • [0047]
    FIGS. 6A-J show various other embodiments of the invention in their deformed states. As in the embodiment of FIG. 5, these devices for maintaining patency of an airway may be implanted into airway-forming tissue of the patient in the illustrated deformed state. Over time, tissue may grow into the device anchors and possibly other parts of the device to at least partially affix the device to the airway-forming tissue. Also over time, the bioerodable spacer portions of the device may bioerode, thereby permitting the device to attempt to move toward a shorter at-rest shape, thereby exerting a force on the airway-forming tissue into which it is implanted to maintain the patient's airway in a patent condition. The deformable bodies of these devices may be formed, e.g., of silicone rubber.
  • [0048]
    In FIGS. 6A-B, device 600 has a stiff bioerodable fiber 608 helically wound within narrow sections 604 of a resiliently deformable body 602 between wide sections 606 to maintain body 602 in its stretched deformed state. Fiber 608 may be made, e.g., of polyglactin 910, which is a copolymer of 90% glycolide and 10% L-lactide. When fiber 608 bioerodes, body 602 will attempt to shorten to its at-rest shape. Anchors 610 are disposed at both ends of body 602. Anchors 610 may be formed from woven polyester, polyethylene or polypropylene to provide for tissue ingrowth.
  • [0049]
    FIGS. 6C-D show a device 611 having a resiliently deformable body 612 in which a plurality elongated openings 614 are formed. In the depicted deformed state, bioerodable, rod shaped, spacers 618 (formed from, e.g., polylactidecoglycolide (PLG)) are disposed in the openings 614 to maintain the body's elongated deformed shape. Paddle-shaped anchor regions 620 having a plurality of holes or depressions 619 are disposed at both ends of body 612. Holes or depressions 619 permit tissue in-growth. Anchor regions 620 may be integral with the central portion of body 612 or may be formed from a different material, such as reinforced polyester. Anchor regions also may be integral with the central portion of body 612 and contain a composite reinforcing element such as a polyester fabric.
  • [0050]
    FIGS. 6E-F show a device 621 similar to that shown in FIGS. 5A-C in which the bioerodable portion 628 is formed of a helically wound bioerodable fiber, such as that discussed above with respect to FIGS. 6A-B and contains anchoring regions 630 of non woven fabric (e.g. polyester, polyethylene, or polypropylene).
  • [0051]
    FIGS. 6G-H show a device 631 having a resiliently deformable body 632 similar to body 602 of FIG. 6A. As shown, body 632 is in a stretched deformed shape. Bioerodable spacers 638 (similar to those of the embodiment shown in FIG. 5A) are disposed in narrow portions 634 between wide portions 636 to maintain body in this stretched shape. Anchors 640 on both ends are formed from an open or closed cell foam material to promote tissue in-growth.
  • [0052]
    FIGS. 6I-J show a device 641 substantially the same as the device shown in FIGS. 6E-F with the exception of the anchors 649 and 650. In this embodiment, anchors 649 and 650 are self-expanding baskets that can be compressed to the form shown as anchor 650 during implantation and will self-expand toward the at-rest shape shown as anchor 649 after deployment. The open areas of the anchors provide material loops and spaces for tissue ingrowth and attachment.
  • [0053]
    Other embodiments of the airway maintaining device may use various aspects of the illustrated embodiments as needed. For example, the anchors at end of the device body may differ from each other.
  • [0054]
    FIGS. 7-9 illustrate therapy provided by embodiments of this invention. In FIGS. 7A-C, a delivery tool 702 has been inserted submandibularly into the patient 700 to deliver an airway maintaining device 710 into a region of the patient's tongue 704 forming part of the patient's airway 708, which is shown as being blocked in FIG. 7A. Device 710 may be, e.g., any of the devices discussed above with respect to FIGS. 5 and 6. As shown in FIG. 7B, the device 710 is delivered in an elongated deformed state. In some embodiments, device 710 when first delivered is not affixed to the tongue tissue. Over time, however, tissue may grow into the anchors 711 of device 710 and/or other parts of the device. Also over time, bioerodable portions 712 of device 710 will bioerode, thereby permitting device 710 to move toward a shorter at-rest shape, thereby applying a force to the patient's tissue to maintain the patency of the airway, as shown in FIG. 7C.
  • [0055]
    In FIGS. 8A-C, a delivery tool 802 has been inserted intraorally and sublingually into the patient 800 to deliver an airway maintaining device 810 into a region of the patient's tongue 804 forming part of the patient's airway 808, which is shown as being blocked in FIG. 8A. Device 810 may be, e.g., any of the devices discussed above with respect to FIGS. 5 and 6. As shown in FIG. 8B, the device 810 is delivered in an elongated deformed state. In some embodiments, device 810 when first delivered is not affixed to the tongue tissue. Over time, however, tissue may grow into the anchors 811 of device 810 and/or other parts of the device. Also over time, bioerodable portions 812 of device 810 will bioerode, thereby permitting device 810 to move toward a shorter at-rest shape, thereby applying a force to the patient's tissue to maintain the patency of the airway, as shown in FIG. 8C.
  • [0056]
    In FIGS. 9A-C, a delivery tool 902 has been inserted intraorally into the patient 900 to deliver an airway maintaining device 910 into a region of the patient's soft palate 904 forming part of the patient's airway 908, which is shown as being blocked in FIG. 9A. Device 910 is described in further detail below with respect to FIGS. 10 and 11. As shown in FIGS. 9B and 11A, the device 910 is delivered in an elongated and straightened deformed state. In some embodiments, device 910 when first delivered is not affixed to the soft palate tissue. Over time, however, tissue may grow into the anchors 920 of device 910 and/or other parts of the device. Also over time, bioerodable portions 918 of device 910 will bioerode, thereby permitting device 910 to move toward a shorter and more curved at-rest shape, thereby applying a force to the patient's soft palate tissue to maintain the patency of the airway, as shown in FIGS. 9C and 11B.
  • [0057]
    FIGS. 10A-C and 11A-B show more details of an airway-maintaining device 910 suitable for implantation in the soft palate. The device's deformed shape is shown in FIGS. 10A and 11A. In this shape, spacers 918 formed from a bioerodable material are disposed in narrow regions 914 of body 912 between wide regions 914 of body 912. Body 912 is formed from a resiliently deformable material (such as, e.g., silicone rubber, polyurethanes or other resiliently deformable polymer or a coil of stainless steel, spring steel, or superelastic nickel-titanium alloy or other resiliently deformable metal, or a composite of the resiliently deformable polymer and metal.) and is deformed into the straight and elongated form shown in FIGS. 10A and 11A. The shorter and more curved at-rest shape of body 912 is shown in FIG. 10B. This is the shape the device will attempt to return to after the bioerodable portions 916 bioerode, thereby exerting force on the airway-forming tissue of the soft palate, as shown in FIG. 11B. In this embodiment, anchors 920 are formed from a non-woven fabric (such as polypropylene or polyester) to promote tissue ingrowth. Other anchors may be used, as desired. In this embodiment, the spacers 918 are injection molded from polycaprolactone, polylactic acid, polyglycolic acid, polylactide coglycolide, polyglactin, poly-L-lactide and have a C shape, although other manufacturing techniques (e.g., dipping processes for applying the spacers over the resiliently deformable polymer or metal), materials, and other shapes may be used as desired.
  • [0058]
    FIGS. 12A-B show another embodiment of an airway maintaining device 1200 implanted submandibularly into tongue tissue 1201 forming part of the patient's airway. Device 1200 has anchors 1202 and 1204 which differ from each other. Anchor 1204 is an expandable anchor, such as the self-expandable anchor 649 described above with respect to FIG. 6I, whereas anchor 1202 is not expandable. As shown in FIG. 12A, device 1200 when implanted into tissue 1201 is in an elongated deformed shape. Over time, bioerodable portions 1206 of device 1200 will bioerode, and device 1200 will attempt to return to its shorter at-rest shape, thereby exerting a force on tissue 1201 to maintain the patency of airway 1208, as shown in FIG. 12B.
  • [0059]
    FIG. 13 is a graph comparing theoretical average tensile force provided to patient airway-forming tissue by various implantable obstructive sleep apnea therapy devices respect to the amount of stretching experienced by the implant. Tether devices are shown by the two lines formed by the square data points. As can be seen, such rigid devices provide no tensile force on the patient's tissue until all slack has been removed, at which point the tether provides a nearly infinite force, possibly exceeding the patient's tolerance limit.
  • [0060]
    The curve formed by the round data points show theoretical tensile force applied by magnet-based obstructive sleep apnea implants. As can be seen, such devices have a very narrow operational range falling with the therapeutic range providing a benefit to the patient through the application of a minimum therapeutic force.
  • [0061]
    The curves formed by the diamond and cross data points show theoretical tensile forces applied by two airway-maintaining devices according to this invention having two different spring constants in their deformable device bodies. As shown, these devices can be designed so that they provide beneficial airway maintenance therapy to the patient over a wide range of lengths.
  • [0062]
    FIGS. 14A-C and 15A-B show yet another embodiment of the invention. Device 1400 has a device body with two elongate rails 1402 and 1404 formed from a resiliently deformable material, such as silicone rubber. A plurality of spaced-apart oval flanges 1406 are attached to rails 1402 and 1404. In the deformed state shown in FIGS. 14A and 15A, C-shaped bioerodable spacers 1408 are disposed between adjacent flanges 1406 to maintain the device in its elongated shape. When spacers 1408 bioerode over time, device 1400 moves toward the at-rest shape shown in FIG. 14B, thereby exerting a force on the patient's airway forming tissue (shown as the tongue 1410 in FIG. 15) to maintain patency of the airway 1412 as shown in FIG. 15B.
  • [0063]
    FIGS. 16A-B demonstrate how multiple airway-maintaining devices may be implanted into a single patient, such as the tongue device 810 and the soft palate device 910 described with respect to FIGS. 8 and 9 above, respectively.
  • [0064]
    Likewise, FIGS. 17A-E show how multiple airway-maintaining devices may be implanted into the same region of airway-forming tissue, such as tongue devices 810 shown in FIGS. 17A-B, soft palate devices 910 shown in FIGS. 17A-C, and similar pharyngeal wall devices 1710 shown in FIGS. 17D-E.
  • [0065]
    FIG. 18A-C show an embodiment of an airway-maintaining device 1800 in which the deformed state of the device body 1802 shown in FIG. 18A is both longer and wider than the at-rest state of the device body 1802 shown in FIG. 18B. Bioerodable spacers 1802 are disposed in openings 1804 formed in resiliently deformable body 1802. As the spacers erode, the body 1802 will move toward its at-rest shape. The openings in the deformed and at rest shapes 1804 and 1806 constitute anchoring elements. This embodiment could be placed in an anatomical structure such as the soft palate and could exert force on the airway forming tissue in two directions to maintain patency.
  • [0066]
    In some embodiments, the device may include one or more bioactive agents in the bioerodable portion(s). Bioactive agents such as drugs or hormones that are eluted during the course of erosion of the bioerodable materials, may serve, for example, to promote healing of the implant wound, or to promote stabilization of the implanted device within the tissue site by, for example, promoting the toughening the fibrotic tissue capsule that forms around the implanted device.
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US9381109May 28, 2014Jul 5, 2016Revent Medical, Inc.Systems and methods for treatment of sleep apnea
US9439801Jun 29, 2012Sep 13, 2016Revent Medical, Inc.Systems and methods for treatment of sleep apnea
US9549806 *Aug 12, 2014Jan 24, 2017Abbott Cardiovascular Systems Inc.Bioresorbable laryngotracheal stent and methods of treatment
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Classifications
International ClassificationA61F5/56
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/56, A61F5/566
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Aug 14, 2015ASAssignment
Owner name: REVENT MEDICAL, INC., CALIFORNIA
Free format text: ASSIGNMENT OF ASSIGNORS INTEREST;ASSIGNORS:GILLIS, EDWARD M.;IANCEA, OCTAVIAN;REEL/FRAME:036333/0367
Effective date: 20101208