Dubliners

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David Campbell Publishers Limited, 1991 - City and town life - 287 pages
1658 Reviews
"Though James Joyce began these stories of Dublin life in 1904 when he was twenty-two and completed them in 1907, their unconventional themes and language led to repeated rejections by publishers and delayed publication until 1914. In the century since, his story “The Dead” has come to be seen as one of the most powerful evocations of human loss and longing that the English language possesses; all the other stories in Dubliners are as beautifully turned and as greatly admired. They remind us once again that James Joyce was not only modernism’s chief innovator but also one of its most intimate and poetic writers. In this edition the text has been revised in keeping with Joyce’s wishes, and the original versions of “The Sisters,” “Eveline,” and “After the Race” have been made available in an appendix, along with Joyce’s suppressed preface to the 1914 edition of Dubliners."--Publisher's website.

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Wonderful collection and a great introduction to Joyce. - LibraryThing
One, the writing is so vivid. - LibraryThing
Characters and pacing, both brilliant. - LibraryThing
This is a nice edition with period photographs. - LibraryThing

Review: Dubliners

User Review  - Kareena Satia - Goodreads

IMAGINATION,ILLUSION,VISION AND CONSCIOUSNESS. Is there ever an end to the amount of regrets,heartbreak and human predicament?Can anyone ever lead a life where they have a proper harmony between their ... Read full review

Review: Dubliners

User Review  - Shelly Fromholtz - Goodreads

Good book of regional (obviously) short stories. I can imagine the impact and controversy these stories had when first published due to the country's changing and evolving political and social ... Read full review

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Contents

Introduction
vii
Select Bibliography 1
l
The Sisters
7
Copyright

7 other sections not shown

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About the author (1991)

James Joyce was born on February 2, 1882, in Dublin, Ireland, into a large Catholic family. Joyce was a very good pupil, studying poetics, languages, and philosophy at Clongowes Wood College, Belvedere College, and the Royal University in Dublin. Joyce taught school in Dalkey, Ireland, before marrying in 1904. Joyce lived in Zurich and Triest, teaching languages at Berlitz schools, and then settled in Paris in 1920 where he figured prominently in the Parisian literary scene, as witnessed by Ernest Hemingway's A Moveable Feast. Joyce's collection of fine short stories, Dubliners, was published in 1914, to critical acclaim. Joyce's major works include A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man, Ulysses, Finnegans Wake, and Stephen Hero. Ulysses, published in 1922, is considered one of the greatest English novels of the 20th century. The book simply chronicles one day in the fictional life of Leopold Bloom, but it introduces stream of consciousness as a literary method and broaches many subjects controversial to its day. As avant-garde as Ulysses was, Finnegans Wake is even more challenging to the reader as an important modernist work. Joyce died just two years after its publication, in 1941.

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