The War of the Worlds (Ad Classic)

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Ad Classic, 2008 - Fiction - 148 pages
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This edition includes artwork by Warwick Goble, commissioned by Pearsons Magazine in 1897, artwork by Alvim Correa for the L.Vandamme 500 copy limited edition in 1906 and cover art by Frank R. Paul, commissioned by Amazing Stories in 1927. "The War of the Worlds was the first science fiction story to treat extraterrestrial aliens realistically." - Isaac Asimov 1974 AD "The daring conception upon which this story hinges is not a mere bit of invention. The War of the Worlds is, as Mr. Wells has himself said of it, "the story of possibility, a piece of realism." Whether or not we agree with the author as to this, there is no denying the strange air of reality with which he has contrived to invest this astonishing narrative of the invasion of Earth by the inhabitants of Mars. It is a wonder story for "grown-ups," and one of the deepest interest and most fascinating style. It shows, more than anything, how helpless man's most formidable engines of war become when matched against forces of which we have had no previous knowledge." - Harpers Brothers 1898 AD

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About the author (2008)

H.G. Wells was born in Bromley, England, the son of an unsuccessful merchant. After a limited education, he was apprenticed to a dry-goods merchant, but soon found he wanted something more out of life. He read widely and got a position as a student assistant in a secondary school, eventually winning a scholarship to the College of Science in South Kensington, where he studied biology under the British biologist and educator, Thomas Henry Huxley. After graduating, Wells took several different teaching positions and began writing for magazines. When his stories began to sell, he left teaching to write full time. Wells's first major novel, The Time Machine (1895), launched his career as a writer, and he began to produce a steady stream of science-fiction tales, short stories, realistic novels, and books of sociology, history, science, and biography, producing one or more books a year. Much of Wells's work is forward-looking, peering into the future of prophesy social and scientific developments, sometimes with amazing accuracy. Along with French writer Jules Verne, Wells is credited with popularizing science fiction, and such novels as The Time Machine and The War of the Worlds (1898) are still widely read. Many of Wells's stories are based on his own experiences. The History of Mr. Polly (1910) draws on the life of Wells's father. Kipps (1905) uses Wells's experience as an apprentice, and Love and Mr. Lewisham (1900) draws on Wells's experiences as a school teacher. Wells also wrote stories showing how the world could be a better place. One such story is A Modern Utopia (1905). As a writer, Wells's range was exceptionally wide and his imagination extremely fertile. While time may have caught up with him (many of the things he predicted have already come to pass), he remains an interesting writer because of his ability to tell a lively tale.

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