Dune

Front Cover
Demco Media, Aug 1, 1992 - Fiction - 535 pages
1039 Reviews
Follows the adventures of Paul Atreides, the son of a betrayed duke given up for dead on a treacherous desert planet and adopted by its fierce, nomadic people, who help him unravel his most unexpected destiny.

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5 stars
708
4 stars
199
3 stars
93
2 stars
23
1 star
16

Fantastic plot and storytelling. - weRead
The writing is poor in places, the pacing uneven. - weRead
Excellent imagery and alive! - weRead
Fantastic character development. - weRead
Extremely difficult to read. - weRead
Good characterization and a haunting setting. - weRead

Review: Dune (Dune Chronicles #1)

User Review  - SM Carrière - Goodreads

Oh thank goodness! I remembered this book as being fantastic when I first read it. I was in my very early teens (probably pre-teens, since I remember feeling naughty reading a book intended for an ... Read full review

Review: Dune (Dune Chronicles #1)

User Review  - Dave B. - Goodreads

I absolutely love this classic Sci-Fi novel. Its a great story with some wonderful lines. This was my third time reading Dune. There are only two points I question, first its very hard to believe the ... Read full review

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About the author (1992)

Frank Herbert worked originally as a journalist, but then turned to science fiction. His Dune series has had a major impact on that genre. Some critics assert that Herbert is responsible for bringing in a new branch of ecological science fiction. He had a personal interest in world ecology, and consulted with the governments of Vietnam and Pakistan about ecological issues. The length of some of Herbert's novels also helped make it acceptable for science fiction authors to write longer books. It is clear that, if the reader is engaged by the story---and Herbert certainly has the ability to engage his readers---length is not important. As is usually the case with popular fiction, it comes down to whether or not the reader is entertained, and Herbert is, above all, an entertaining and often compelling writer. His greatest talent is his ability to create new worlds that are plausible to readers, in spite of their alien nature, such as the planet Arrakis in the Dune series.

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