The Sorrows of Young Werther

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ReadHowYouWant.com, Nov 1, 2006 - Fiction - 304 pages
7 Reviews
'the Sorrows of Young Werther'' is a tragic story written by literary genius Johann Wolfgang von Goethe. First published in 1774, it is the story of a sensitive young man who is in love with a married woman who rejects him. Goethe has brilliantly captured the poignancy and destructive effects of unrequited love. Heart-rending!
  

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Review: The Sorrows of Young Werther and Selected Writings (Signet Classics)

User Review  - Blair - Goodreads

Almost overwhelmingly Romantic in conception, I can see why this appealed to people at the time. These days it seems a bit overblown and at times you just want to give Werther a slap, but the prose in the translation I read was quite beautiful. Read full review

Review: The Sorrows of Young Werther and Selected Writings (Signet Classics)

User Review  - Thai Son - Goodreads

The Sorrows of Young Werther was kind of cute, of course except for the ending. I actually found myself enjoying the short stories near the end of this paperback a lot more than the Sorrows of Young ... Read full review

Contents

Book I
1
May 10
5
May 12
7
May 13
9
May 15
10
May 17
12
May 22
16
May 26
19
July 16
77
July 18
79
July 19
81
July 20
82
July 24
83
July 25
84
July 26
85
August 15
106

May 27
27
June 16
31
June 19
49
June 21
51
June 29
55
July 1
58
July 6
67
July 8
70
July 10
72
July 11
73
July 13
76
September 3
120
November 26
133
February 8
146
April 19
160
July 16
169
September 6
182
October 30
195
December 1
214
December 12
231
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About the author (2006)

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, 1749-1832 Johann Wolfgang von Goethe was born in Frankfurt am Main. He was greatly influenced by his mother, who encouraged his literary aspirations. After troubles at school, he was taught at home and gained an exceptionally wide education. At the age of 16, Goethe began to study law at Leipzig University from 1765 to 1768, and he also studied drawing with Adam Oeser. After a period of illness, he resumed his studies in Strasbourg from 1770 to 1771. Goethe practiced law in Frankfurt for two years and in Wetzlar for a year. He contributed to the Frankfurter Gelehrte Anzeigen from 1772 to 1773, and in 1774 he published his first novel, self-revelatory Die Leiden des Jungen Werthers. In 1775 he was welcomed by Duke Karl August into the small court of Weimar, where he worked in several governmental offices. He was a council member and member of the war commission, director of roads and services, and managed the financial affairs of the court. Goethe was released from day-to-day governmental duties to concentrate on writing, although he was still general supervisor for arts and sciences, and director of the court theatres. In the 1790s Goethe contributed to Friedrich von Schiller ́s journal Die Horen, published Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship, and continued his writings on the ideals of arts and literature in his own journal, Propylšen. The first part of his masterwork, Faust, appeared in 1808, and the second part in 1832. Goethe had worked for most of his life on this drama, and was based on Christopher Marlowe's Faust. From 1791 to 1817, Goethe was the director of the court theatres. He advised Duke Carl August on mining and Jena University, which for a short time attracted the most prominent figures in German philosophy. He edited Kunst and Altertum and Zur Naturwissenschaft. Goethe died in Weimar on March 22, 1832. He and Duke Schiller are buried together, in a mausoleum in the ducal cemetery.

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