Dune, Part 1

Front Cover
Chilton Books, 1965 - Fiction - 412 pages
160 Reviews
Future space fantasy concerning a time when the human race has reached a point of intellectual stagnation and receives the help of a space-age Messiah and prophet.

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5 stars
81
4 stars
50
3 stars
19
2 stars
7
1 star
3

Overall the writing is lush, emotive and action-packed. - Goodreads
I feel the ending was stunted. - Goodreads
Part 3 was very easy to read. - Goodreads
The writing was egregious. - Goodreads
I had some great visuals throughout the book. - Goodreads
This book is very much about character development. - Goodreads

Review: Dune (Dune Chronicles #1)

User Review  - Tommy Grooms - Goodreads

Dune was far more than a story with space as a backdrop. The book did a superb job of tying the setting into its mood, and its vocabulary was familiar and foreign at the same time. The characters were ... Read full review

Review: Dune (Dune Chronicles #1)

User Review  - Elena Sands - Goodreads

How do I even begin? This is probably my favorite book of all time, even above Tolkein's books. (oh no she didn't!). I read this as a teenager and fell in love. I read it again every few years to see ... Read full review

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About the author (1965)

Frank Herbert worked originally as a journalist, but then turned to science fiction. His Dune series has had a major impact on that genre. Some critics assert that Herbert is responsible for bringing in a new branch of ecological science fiction. He had a personal interest in world ecology, and consulted with the governments of Vietnam and Pakistan about ecological issues. The length of some of Herbert's novels also helped make it acceptable for science fiction authors to write longer books. It is clear that, if the reader is engaged by the story---and Herbert certainly has the ability to engage his readers---length is not important. As is usually the case with popular fiction, it comes down to whether or not the reader is entertained, and Herbert is, above all, an entertaining and often compelling writer. His greatest talent is his ability to create new worlds that are plausible to readers, in spite of their alien nature, such as the planet Arrakis in the Dune series.

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