The Laws

Front Cover
Penguin Books Limited, 1970 - Law - 533 pages
8 Reviews
In the Laws, Plato describes in fascinating detail a comprehensive system of legislation in a small agricultural utopia he named Magnesia. His laws not only govern crime and punishment, but also form a code of conduct for all aspects of life in his ideal state - from education, sport and religion to sexual behaviour, marriage and drinking parties. Plato sets out a plan for the day-to-day rule of Magnesia, administered by citizens and elected officials, with supreme power held by a Council. Although Plato's views that citizens should act in complete obedience to the law have been read as totalitarian, the Laws nonetheless constitutes a highly impressive programme for the reform of society and provides a crucial insight into the mind of one of Classical Greece's foremost thinkers.

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Review: Cratylus/Parmenides/Greater Hippias/Lesser Hippias

User Review  - Viktoria Michaelis - Goodreads

Plato's work Parmenides has been rated by some as a spoof, a less-than-serious work, a work filled with contradictions and errors. This it may well be, but it is also a fascinating account, an ... Read full review

Review: Cratylus/Parmenides/Greater Hippias/Lesser Hippias

User Review  - Erik Graff - Goodreads

I purchased this Loeb volume for Reginald Allen's course on the Parmenides because it provided both a version of the Greek text and an additional translation. Read full review

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About the author (1970)

Plato (c. 427?347 b.c.) founded the Academy in Athens, the prototype of all Western universities, and wrote more than twenty philosophical dialogues.


Trevor J. Saunders has translated many volumes of Plato for the Penguin Classics.
Trevor J. Saunders has translated many volumes of Plato for the Penguin Classics.
Trevor J. Saunders has translated many volumes of Plato for the Penguin Classics.

Richard Stalley is professor of ancient philosophy at the University of Glasgow.

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