To Kill a Mockingbird

Front Cover
Vintage, 2004 - African Americans - 307 pages
138 Reviews
THE ORIGINAL TEXT 'Shoot all the Bluejays you want, if you can hit 'em, but remember it's a sin to kill a Mockingbird.' A lawyer's advice to his children as he defends the real mockingbird of this classic novel - a black man charged with attacking a white girl. Through the young eyes of Scout and Jem Finch, Harper Lee explores the irrationality of adult attitudes to race and class in the Deep South of the 1930s with both compassion and humour. She also creates one of the great heroes of literature in their father, Atticus, whose lone struggle for justice pricks the conscience of a town steeped in prejudice, violence and hypocrisy.

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World-class writing style. - Flipkart
... a must read to all who enjoy great storytelling. - Flipkart
If you're not really sure, research always helps. - Flipkart
And the plot slowly builds up. - Flipkart

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User Review  - Hyacinth - Walmart

I have no clue the reason Walmart will sell this type of product to the public in the name of new book. Read full review

Review: To Kill a Mockingbird (To Kill a Mockingbird #1)

User Review  - Joel - Goodreads

I loved this story! I was completely captivated from the start. This is the type of book where I would often miss something out, and then have read the previous paragraph again, I am not used to ... Read full review

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About the author (2004)

Harper Lee was born in 1926 in Monroeville, Alabama, a village that is still her home. She attended local schools and the University of Alabama. Before she started writing she lived in New York, where she worked in the reservations department of an international airline. She has been awarded the Pulitzer Prize, two honorary degrees and various other literary awards. Her chief interests apart from writing are nineteenth-century literature and eighteenth-century music, watching politicians and cats, travelling and being alone. She was friends with Truman Capote who apparently was the inspiration for the character Dill in To Kill a Mockingbird.

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