Laws (Google eBook)

Front Cover
Cosimo, Inc., Jan 1, 2008 - Philosophy - 308 pages
2 Reviews
A sharp contrast to the Utopian nature of The Republic, Laws sets out in practical form the structure of actual society, and how, realistically, humanity can expect to govern itself. The last of the dialogues by the Greek philosopher and mathematician PLATO (c. 428 B.C.c. 347 B.C.), this meditation on the nature of culture contains much that sounds outmoded to modern earssuch as discussions on slavery and the proper place of womenyet it remains an insightful examination of questions that continue to trouble us today, such as: [ the importance of education [ the nature of beauty [ the value of artistic endeavors [ how to implement matters of justice [ the principles of government [ the dangers presented by religion [ what constitutes a crime [ and much more. A foundational work of both Western philosophy and classical literature, in a highly readable 1871 translation by Benjamin Jowett, this is essential reading for students, thinkers, and anyone who wishes to be considered well educated.
  

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Review: Laws, Books 7-12

User Review  - Alice Mennie - Goodreads

oh very very brilliant it made me laugh cry It is a really very special book to read. poetry really. with laughter and love and the wonderful nature and the stars and the moon it is what life is about. Of course one can enjoy reading its really very lovely to read. It brought me peace. Read full review

Review: Lysis/Symposium/Gorgias (Loeb Classical Library 166)

User Review  - Jonathan - Goodreads

Loeb Classical Library No. 166 Read full review

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Contents

I
9
II
33
III
53
IV
78
V
97
VI
115
VII
146
VIII
180
IX
201
X
228
XI
254
XII
278
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About the author (2008)

Plato was born c. 427 B.C. in Athens, Greece, to an aristocratic family very much involved in political government. Pericles, famous ruler of Athens during its golden age, was Plato's stepfather. Plato was well educated and studied under Socrates, with whom he developed a close friendship. When Socrates was publically executed in 399 B.C., Plato finally distanced himself from a career in Athenian politics, instead becoming one of the greatest philosophers of Western civilization. Plato extended Socrates's inquiries to his students, one of the most famous being Aristotle. Plato's The Republic is an enduring work, discussing justice, the importance of education, and the qualities needed for rulers to succeed. Plato felt governors must be philosophers so they may govern wisely and effectively. Plato founded the Academy, an educational institution dedicated to pursuing philosophic truth. The Academy lasted well into the 6th century A.D., and is the model for all western universities. Its formation is along the lines Plato laid out in The Republic. Many of Plato's essays and writings survive to this day. Plato died in 347 B.C. at the age of 80.

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